towers and low buildings, top view
New paradigms of urban regeneration. In China between tradition and innovation

Colossal heights, dynamism and urban integration surprisingly manage to coexist in the new Konka complex in Shenzhen. Kang QiaoJia Cheng develops a design model with an iconic impact on the skyline, preserving a human and natural scale inspired by the urban tradition of historic Chinese cities

Towers up to 280 meters high made of glass, softened by a climbing copper mesh and alternating with low modules that dialogue with the rest of the city, making the intervention urbanistically "porous" and permeable. The use of green in the squares inside the complex and on the terraces, conveys the attractiveness of built places that integrate with the natural element, balancing the modern impact of architecture and materials used

towers covered in copper

The dynamism combined with the perception of a humanly appreciable scale is achieved, despite the imposing size of the complex, thanks to the skillful use of the unevenness of the land, which creates architectural features of the terraces and buildings of different heights, and the use of a repeated design module of 9x9 meters that aims to characterize the identity of the building. The modular repetition makes it possible to identify the personality of the intervention when seen both from near and far

towers covered in copper

With the Konka complex, a new paradigm of urban regeneration is imposed on the city that aims to replace the old model of closed shopping malls: a taller tower in the south-west corner of the site that houses the headquarters of Konka Group, an important electronics manufacturing company; at the opposite corner the apartment tower, which offers its users a luxurious view over the bay of Shenzhen; the complex then dematerializes and resizes until it composes a lively urban fabric that imaginatively evokes the traditional pattern of historic Chinese cities, fragmented and porous to the surrounding landscape

towers covered in copper

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